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Thoughts on Teaching – The Bane of Summer Productivity – 8/3/2016

The summer is almost over.  I am a little over halfway through my summer classes, and I feel like I have not done even a quarter of the things that I had planned to do.  This is common for everyone that I see who has a long break like this.  We all have big plans and then get so little of those things done.  I think it’s the dilemma of high expectations.  We expect so much of ourselves in a break, but we fail to take into account the reality of how much time just normal day-to-day stuff takes.

I was asked by a friend how my summer was going, and all I could say is that it was busy.  Just taking this week as an example, I have two boys doing summer band each day from 7:30-4, I have another daughter in an all week summer camp, the other daughter is in summer Montessori three days a week and has yoga one night of the week, and I’m teaching this week and going away to a conference in San Antonio this weekend.  And that’s just one week.  I feel like I have just been running around making sure I get done what needs to get done, while also getting my work done and getting the necessary relaxation for the summer as well.

And that’s where the summer has gone. I had grand plans.  Now, with what time is left, my main goal is to finish out my summer classes and be prepared for starting the fall semester. If I had set that as my goal from the beginning, I would have been very happy, as that would have been a very reasonable and achievable goal.  As it stands now, I am frustrated at how little I have gotten done.  Maybe we should all just not be so hard on ourselves and set more realistic goals and expectations.  If I can just start back in with the fall semester being ready for everything and being reasonably relaxed and clear of mind, that should be enough.

I’m going to keep telling myself that it is enough.  Can you repeat that mantra with me?  Reasonable expectations are good enough!

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Thoughts on Life – Summer Balance -6/22/2016

I have been trying to ease back into working toward material to do with work as the summer continues to move on.  I have an 8-week break this summer, as I am not teaching again until the second summer session.  What that means is that I have a number of weeks to take off completely, which is largely what I have been doing to this point, but now it is starting to be time to think about academic work again.

I can’t say I have done a whole lot to this point, but I have made a few starts.  For one, I completed a textbook chapter review yesterday, which was something on my agenda for the early part of the summer.  I have also participated in a few activities with McGraw-Hill as part of my role as a Digital Faculty Consultant with them.  And, in the past week or so, I have been trying to catch up on some of the blogs and e-newsletters that I read, as well as dabbling with some of the academic podcasts I listen to.  Shortly, I will start working on my summer class, although I still have about a 3-week window before starting.  I am not planning any major changes from last summer, so it will really just be a case of changing up the dates and making sure everything is in there.  There are a few changes that I made last semester, including adding screencast videos for the online class, so those will need to be created for the summer session.  Otherwise, summer prep is not too bad.

One interesting discovery I have made is the Student Caring project (studentcaring.com).  I was turned onto the project from either a Chronicle of Higher Education or Inside Higher Ed blog about podcasts that we should be listening to.  I came to this site through the podcast, and I will certainly make it part of what I am going to be looking at in the near future as I get back into thinking about my own job.  The project is designed to help professors with all of the issues that we face in an environment that is aimed at helping us teach better, live better, and think better.  I have only dabbled in it so far, although I have probably listened to about 15 of their podcast episodes so far.  The general professor part of the site has both curated and guest posts on issues related to teaching in higher education.  The podcasts (which are what I have accessed so far), are aimed at talking through issues on teaching in higher education.  I have thoroughly enjoyed them so far and would recommend them to anyone teaching at a college or university.  I am currently in the middle of the series titled, “What Your Students Probably Don’t Know,” which has been interesting and already given me a couple of ideas for my own classes, especially in formulating syllabi and course outlines for our students.  I accessed the podcasts through iTunes, but I am sure they are available in multiple places.

Otherwise, I am just starting to do some thinking on my classes for the fall.  I already do a hybrid American history class, and I am thinking of moving it to be even more thematic in approach so that the ideas hold together even better than I think they already do right now.  I am teaching both halves of the American history survey this fall, and I am thinking of reworking the second half one.  I already have a general set of themes, but not everything fits in with those themes right now.  I am considering using a race/ethnicity/immigration theme, as over 1/3 of what I already have works with that theme, and I would have two writing assignments already ready to go to aim at that theme.  It would help me feel more focused in what I am doing in the class and make it more apparent for the students how everything fits together.  So, that is what I am thinking about.

Anyway, I just wanted to hop in here for a few minutes and update.  I’ll be back for more later.

Thoughts on Teaching – Third Week of Online Classes – 9/14/2014

This has been a mixed semester so far.  I really thought it was going to be a rough one after the first week, which I referenced in my last post.  I got everything cleaned up from my first mistake of having the incorrect link up for my classroom, and things have been fairly smooth since then.  I always forget from one fall semester to the next how clueless about how to work online many of these students are in their first classes at college.  Many students get shuttled into online classes as they work well with any schedule and are often perceived as easier than face-to-face classes.  Yet, many have had no experience with online classes and really have trouble in those first weeks of classes.  So, I end up doing a lot of technical support and repetition of information to the students as they try to grasp what they need to do.  Luckily, by the time you get to the third week, most of that is behind, and the rest of the next couple of weeks is mostly maintaining the course and keeping it going.

What is interesting is how these first weeks are the same every semester.  If I could somehow get it through to all of my students, I would set up a couple of things:

  1. The reaction I get from students who are taking their first online class with me is that my class is complicated and hard to understand.  By contrast, any student who is coming into my class from other classes (and often the same students who were confused at first by the end of the semester) comments on how well laid-out and straightforward it is.  I wish I could tell those students more directly that they will get used to it.
  2. Read the course outline.  Again, read the course outline.  And, read it again.  Have a question?  Read the course outline.  Have a specific question?  Look in that section of the course outline and see if I have answered it already.
  3. If you have a question that you can’t find the answer to, let me know as soon as possible.  Do not wait until the second or third week to ask me a question that you had from the first moment in the class.  By then, assignments will have come due, and it will be harder to fix things.
  4. Come by and talk to me if you have any questions.  I can show you how everything works, and it often works better to show you how things are done rather than tell you.

You might think, well, why don’t you just say these things.  The issue is that I do.  In fact, I say them over and over.  However, here is an example of what I am up against.  Shortly after I wrote my last post, I got an email from a student.  He said that some students (including him) were have trouble getting to the correct assignment and I should really tell the students about the problems there.  If you will remember from my last post, the issue was that I had two contradictory links on how to access the textbook site in the classroom.  I discovered this on Tuesday and corrected it at that point.  So, I am getting this email about a week later telling me that I really needed to tell the students about this.  As I then pointed out to that student, I had sent out 4 different announcements to students addressing this issue.  I had also answered two questions posted in the questions forum in the class about this issue.  I had answered about 20 different emails from students about this issue.  So, when this student emails me telling me that I had not done anything to inform the students about this problem, I just had nothing left to say.  And, this is the problem, no matter how many times I say anything, I can’t say it enough to reach every student.

So, what really is the answer is that I just have to keep my cool and remember that every student is new to this.  Their problems are unique to them and they do not have the eight years of online teaching experience behind them.  Unfortunately, this is not something I am particularly good with, as I get easily frustrated after dealing with issues over and over everyday.  I just have to remind myself over and over about this.

The good thing is, by the third week, this section of troubleshooting and explaining is pretty much done.  Some scattered issues with my online classes will come up, I’m sure, but things should be fairly stable until the first set of big assignments are due.  I can’t say as much for my hybrid classes, but that will be another post.

Introduction

So, here it is.  My blog.  What fun.  I have tried this several times before in several different formats (Tripod, Salon, Weatherford College), and who knows if this one will be any more successful than before.  I need a place, however, to write and think and work and share, and this seems as good of a place as any.  Over time, this may or may not develop into anything, but I am going to use it to start with in conjunction with Evernote, as I work my way through the articles that I’ve been reading.  I will post up some links and thoughts.  I don’t know if it will go any further than this, but hey, here we go.